Book Review

Weaver: The Kervanian Chronicles Book 1

Friday 28 February, 2014



Weaver: The Kervanian Chronicles Book 1

Rating: 3.5/5

Weaver: The Kervanian Chronicles Book One - Katherine Arandez

Weaver is a complex fantasy story that draws you in from the very beginning. From the first few lines I was catapulted into another world and through Kate Merin’s interactions with her brothers and others, I began to learn the details of a well thought-out and interesting plot.

Arandez’s world-building is amazing. The thing that I got most from this novel was how clear of an image she had for the entire story. Unfortunately, this also worked to her detriment— a lot of the action was lost or bogged down by long, boring descriptions of people’s appearances from the color of their eyes to the color of the sneakers. I believe what I read was an unedited version of the final copy and I think with tighter refinement the story could flow a little easier and not lose the author’s image at the same time.

While the story kept me intrigued the entire time, the writing was hard to get into at first. Before the story picked up its stride, the dialogue was really forced and unnatural. Throughout the story, my biggest complaint was simply that there was so much information, and yet not enough or at least not subtly communicated. Huge concepts are explained offhand in a few short sentences while other ideas (such as the Delta c29 frequency used to get past magical shields) were never fully explained. Instead of weaving the information about the subtext into the plot, it was often just handed to you, usually through Kate Merin, who from the get-go knows way more about everything going on than anyone else in the story including the reader.

Another issue I had was keeping track of all of the names. People were often referred to by title first (Nerva, Mimien) but their given names were all really similar and they were all of a similar status so at times I had no idea who was talking or how they specifically fit into the plot, but context was enough to help through that issue.

All the same, I was hooked the entire time. Once I got through the first few pages and the story began to pick up, I didn’t notice the writing anymore, I just wanted to know what happened next. I think that the only thing keeping this book from a full 4 or maybe even higher is a good, unbiased editor to trim the fat and help hone the author’s strong natural voice. The extra half star is because despite its flaws, I’m really excited to read the next installment in the series. For a fresh take on magic, time travel, and alien races, this is a great place to start.tory that draws you in from the very beginning. From the first few lines I was catapulted into another world and through Kate Merin’s interactions with her brothers and others, I began to learn the details of a well thought-out and interesting plot.

Arandez’s world-building is amazing. The thing that I got most from this novel was how clear of an image she had for the entire story. Unfortunately, this also worked to her detriment— a lot of the action was lost or bogged down by long, boring descriptions of people’s appearances from the color of their eyes to the color of the sneakers. I believe what I read was an unedited version of the final copy and I think with tighter refinement the story could flow a little easier and not lose the author’s image at the same time.

While the story kept me intrigued the entire time, the writing was hard to get into at first. Before the story picked up its stride, the dialogue was really forced and unnatural. Throughout the story, my biggest complaint was simply that there was so much information, and yet not enough or at least not subtly communicated. Huge concepts are explained offhand in a few short sentences while other ideas (such as the Delta c29 frequency used to get past magical shields) were never fully explained. Instead of weaving the information about the subtext into the plot, it was often just handed to you, usually through Kate Merin, who from the get-go knows way more about everything going on than anyone else in the story including the reader.

Another issue I had was keeping track of all of the names. People were often referred to by title first (Nerva, Mimien) but their given names were all really similar and they were all of a similar status so at times I had no idea who was talking or how they specifically fit into the plot, but context was enough to help through that issue.

All the same, I was hooked the entire time. Once I got through the first few pages and the story began to pick up, I didn’t notice the writing anymore, I just wanted to know what happened next. I think that the only thing keeping this book from a full 4 or maybe even higher is a good, unbiased editor to trim the fat and help hone the author’s strong natural voice. The extra half star is because despite its flaws, I’m really excited to read the next installment in the series. For a fresh take on magic, time travel, and alien races, this is a great place to start.
Review By: Amanda - growinginbrooklyn.tumblr.com